OUR MUSINGS

Why Collaboration in the Workplace is Important

workplace-collaboration

Time and time again, history and experience have proven more can be accomplished by many than by an individual. It is not surprising this truism extends to the workplace in the form of collaboration. Collaboration is a buzz word in business today. Companies are trending toward open-office environments and even pulling remote employees back into the office to facilitate cross pollination of ideas. There is much to be gained from understanding the benefits of effective collaboration in the workplace.

In a collaborative work environment, businesses are able to complete more projects. There is efficiency in numbers. When work is delegated strategically, tasks are assigned by competency and bandwidth. This ensures the task will not only be completed well, but in a timely manner.

Sharing ideas and suggestions promotes cross-functional understanding within departments. Brainstorming in a group setting allows individuals to think outside of their specialty or niche area. Greater awareness of business operations inspires cohesive work. It also puts employees in a position to better serve internal stakeholders. After all, your coworkers are also your clients.

Lastly, positive collaborative environments increase employee engagement. Frequent communication allows team members to develop bonds. Humans are social creatures by nature. Workers who feel their input and work is valued by their management and team are more motivated to contribute and less likely to leave.

Collaboration inspires work that is efficient, cross-functional, and valued. When a workplace environment is conducive to producing this type of work, everybody wins, not just the business.

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Personalize your content to reach the right target

Is your content in the driver seat or is your focus on hitting deadlines and meeting expectations? Slow it down and reassess. Successful campaign copy is focused, personalized and targeted on the key audience. Try these top tips to staying true to your message.

Know your audience. Target the content to meet your specific audience, sharing knowledge that drives their interest, sets you apart from others in your industry and engages the reader to look for more from your business.

Watch your language. Sure, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, the English language currently contains over 170,000 words at the present moment, but that doesn’t mean you have to use every one of them in your copy. Maintain a level-playing field when it comes to content and keep the context relative.

Play it Out. Your content will flow through various platforms and come in contact with numerous end-users. The trick is to maintain focus on the audience, watch their engagement and look for opportunities to add value to your brand messaging.

When it’s time to create your next campaign, whether it’s social or content, ask yourself – do I know my audience? Don’t hit ‘SEND’ until you have determined if Uncle Jack is really the right fit for that social post on the newest campaign. He just might not be the right audience.

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A Week Without LG

Those who know the dgs team well, know that we go by our initials most of the time. LG is Leslie Galbreath, Chief Executive Officer. I’m RB, Rebecca Boyle, Executive Assistant to the CEO. Initials make for fast communication, especially when you’re referring to the same people’s names about a million times a day. And it soon becomes habit. You even begin to think in terms of and call people by their initials instead of their names.

Recently, LG was on vacation and I’ve spent some time reflecting on what goes into a week without her here at dgs from my point of view. As you’d guess based on our job titles, LG and I have a very close working relationship. As LG’s assistant, my job calls for a variety of different types of work each day–work that supports LG, work that supports our clients and work that supports our agency as a whole. When LG is out of the office, I step in to handle a number of things that she’d usually handle if she were here. Some are expected, some are things that you just can’t plan for.

I may review work on behalf of LG and send it to a client without her seeing it, I may create a solution to a client’s challenge without her feedback or I may even manage an urgent project from start to finish. Sometimes I know I’ve got it, sometimes something takes me a bit out of my comfort zone. That’s where a combination of past experience, judgement, advice from my coworkers, that gut feeling of “am I comfortable with this?” and self-confidence comes in.

While there are sometimes moments of feeling a little in over my head, I start with the most important thing, then move to the next most important thing and work my way down the line. There are always a bunch of things that I’d love to do that temporarily get put aside.

At the end of the week, there’s exhaustion (especially if it’s been a crazy week at home too) but there’s also a sense of accomplishment knowing that I’ve done my best and that I’ve helped the dgs team do their best. I love being able to check all of the important things off the to-do list. It makes me feel good knowing that I can hold down the fort for a little while so that LG can get some well-deserved rest. I definitely couldn’t do it on my own, but I have a strong team of dgs friends around me. There are times when all of us step up to do things that we wouldn’t normally do. That’s what makes us a team and that’s what makes us successful. But, I always look forward to when LG comes back. I miss her when she’s gone.

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Why are your emails never opened? 5 tricks to improve email open and read rates

5 tricks to improve emailEmail marketing ranks as the third most effective marketing channel to reach your audience. Studies suggest that it has great reach, offers a high ROI, and is the preferred communication channel for most clients. Despite this preference, it isn’t always easy to convince readers to open your email.

If you catch them at the wrong time, say the wrong thing, or make a simple mistake, you can lose their attention. To help make sure your campaign is as successful as possible, here are five reasons people may not open your emails, and how you can fix it:

1. Your subject line is generic

Your audience is bombarded with many marketing emails every single day, so if yours are lost in the shuffle they’ll never get opened. Personalization and incentive offers are a great way to grab somebody’s attention immediately and give them a chance to consider opening your email. In fact, studies show that simply personalizing an email subject line had higher clickthrough rates than emails that did not. All you need to do is start adding first names before the rest of your subject line.

2. Your preview text isn’t working

Email is no longer a traditional desktop-based communication tool. According to Litmus’ “State of Email” report, 54% of emails were opened on a mobile device in 2016. As mobile usage continues to increase, this number stands to increase as well. What this means is that your preview text is more important than ever. When a user opens their email application on a mobile device, they’re going to see three things — the sender, the subject line, and the preview text. You’ll have about 100 characters to convince the reader to open your email, so you need to make every word count.

3. You’re not using other forms of engaging content

Using videos in your email is a great way to increase clickthrough rates, how much of your email people read, and even conversions. Simply including the word video in your subject line is often enough to encourage people to open the email and look. If your emails struggle to attract opens or conversions, creating some videos and advertising them is an easy way to give your campaign a quick shot of adrenaline. You can also integrate other interactive coolness.

4. Your email went out on the wrong day

When you have your audience’s undivided attention they’re more likely to open and read your email. You need to be smart about when you send your messages. These studies show that by far the most successful email messages are sent on Tuesday. Accordingly, email open rates tend to be lower on Wednesday. During the weekday, Thursday tends to be the day with the lowest amount of marketing emails sent, and it also tends to be the day with the highest open and engagement rates. Thursday should be your plan B. Oh yeah, you want to avoid weekends — open rates drop drastically over the weekend because your audience is busy and less willing to open business-related emails.

5. You’re emailing the wrong audience

Segmentation — one of the most obvious reasons that people don’t open your emails is because it simply doesn’t apply to them. If you find that open rates are particularly low, it’s entirely possible that you either have the wrong message or the wrong audience. The solution to this is carefully segmenting your audience and developing a message specifically for them. Create campaigns based on their position in your marketing funnel. If they’ve already bought from you, offer them tips and how-tos on how to get the most from your products or services. If they haven’t, give them more targeted information.

Having trouble converting in your email marketing campaign? Let us help.

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